Martyrdom in Islam

الغلاف الأمامي
Cambridge University Press, 15‏/01‏/2007 - 206 من الصفحات
In recent times Islamic martyrdom has become associated with suicide missions conducted by extremists. However, as David Cook demonstrates, this type of martyrdom is very different from the classical definition which condemned suicide and stipulated that anyone who died a believer could be considered a martyr. Ideas about martyrdom have evolved to suit prevailing circumstances, and it is the evolution of these interpretations that Cook charts in this fascinating history. The book covers the earliest sources on martyrdom including those from the Jewish and Christian traditions, discussions about what constituted martyrdom, and differences in attitudes between Sunnis and Shi'ites. A concluding section discusses martyrdom in today's radical environment. There is no other book which considers the topic so systematically, and which draws so widely on the literary sources. This will be essential reading for students of Islamic history, and for those looking for an informed account of this controversial topic.
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

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المحتوى

القسم 1
12
القسم 2
31
القسم 3
45
القسم 4
74
القسم 5
98
القسم 6
116
القسم 7
135
القسم 8
165

طبعات أخرى - عرض جميع المقتطفات

عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة

نبذة عن المؤلف (2007)

David Cook is Assistant Professor in Religious Studies at Rice University. His publications include Studies in Muslim Apocalyptic (2002), Understanding Jihad (2005), and Contemporary Muslim Apocalyptic Literature (2005).

David Cook is Assistant Professo in Religious Studies at Rice University. He has written Studies in Muslim Apocalyptic (2002), Understanding Jihad (2005), and Contemporary Muslim Apocalyptic Literature (2005).

Patricia Crone was born on March 28, 1945 in Kyndelose, Denmark. She received undergraduate and doctoral degrees from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. She taught at Oxford University and Cambridge University before joining the Institute for Advanced Study, an independent research center, where she was a professor from 1997 until retiring in 2014. She explored archaeological records and contemporary Greek and Aramaic sources to challenge views on the roots and evolution of Islam. She wrote numerous books during her lifetime including Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World written with Michael Cook, God's Rule: Government and Islam: Six Centuries of Medieval Islamic Political Thought, and The Nativist Prophets of Early Islamic Iran. She died from cancer on July 11, 2015 at the age of 70.

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