صور الصفحة
PDF
النشر الإلكتروني

estates, they never think of marriage; their delicacy is such, for they are extremely proud, vain and ignorant, that they despise men of their own colour; and though they have their amorous desires abundantly gratified by them and black men secretly, they will not avow these connections. It would be considered an indeniable stain in the character of a white man to enter into a matrimonial bondage with one of them; he would be despised in the community, and excluded from all society on that account.

"All men shou'd wed with their similitude;
"Like shou'd with like in love and years engage."

When one of them gets a child as brown or browner than herself, it is considered a very great blemish in her character; on the contray, if it chances to be fairer, it is her greatest pride and glory: her friends and relations rejoice—the bantling is handled and dandled—the father is flattered and praised—" a man, for true"—the mother is caressed—a joyful mother! On which account females use every art to set themselves off to the best advantage, to make themselves pleasing and engaging companions for white men; and when one of them is disbanded bv the man who had her in keeping, (or as they fay, she had in keeping) she plumps up her breasts like an innocent virgin, or wanton bashsul bride, visits balls and plays, and stroles about until she is picked up by somebody else. They are very artsul,

I % and and dispose of their ware to the greatest advantage; maidenheads are very inticing; and though their arms have been as common as the chairs of barbers for years, they will impose themselves for maids; for in these cases they are more knowing than whites. I have often met many fine looking Mongrel girls, young and innocent to appearance, as deceptious as any Covent Garden country miss.

Some men are so weak and filly as to think that black girls will not suit their purposes, and bargain with the parents of Mongtels to hire their daughters for the use of prostitution. Nay, even Creole ladies, as I have faid before, will hire their negroe wenches to white men for that use. If you wish to get a fine young Mongrel, you must solicit the favour of the mistress, or give five pounds to the black mother as well as to the tawny daughter.—They fay in their song,

"Come, carry me in a room;
"Come, carry me in a room;
"And give them five pound piece.

"Come, carry me in a room;
"Come, carry me in a room;
"And lay me on the bed."

The black women use every means to draw • young men to their rookeries, in order to prostitute their daughters; I have been often compelled by the mother to spend a whole night with

her her gingerbread daughter.—Those gypsies have a wondersul ascendancy over men, and have injured many, both powerful and subordinate; the poor slaves on a plantation are obliged to pay them as much adoration as the Portuguese do the Hostess or Virgin Mary; for the government of the cowskin depends in a great measure on their smiles or frowns; therefore I beg, whatever department of life may be your lot, that you will keep your employer's bosom-gipsy modestly at a distancej that is, not to be free or familiar with her, and not to be respectsul or impudent to her, whereby you will loose your consequence, and she will insult you; and do not quarrel with her if possible.

Never strive to seduce your friend or employer's kept-mistress, for it is mean, and will injure you with batchelors in general; but if she haunts you, so that you cannot well avoid her, do not be a Joseph: I was once plagued by a letcherous tawny whore, who followed me in every private room, singing bawdy catches, with wanton gestures, and luring and lascivious invitations; and because that 1 acted through principle, and had nothing to do with her, the deceitsul Mrs. Potipher, the vile incendiary, the damnable dæmon of iniquity, artsully insinuated all the base stratagems which her malicious heart could devise against me; by which means my employer treated me so ill, that I was obliged to discharge myself.

It was then I refolv'd evermore to beware
Of provoking the brown, as well as the fair;
But keep them my friends wherever I'd go:
For a gipsy when slighted's a dangerous foe.

O then I advise you, be brisk with each fa\ry
Nor reject a kind offer to grasp at a snare \
Yet, pray never strive to seduce the soft rate,
But, when they invite—take care of your place.

In towns, Mongrels are commonly taught to read and write, when their parents can afford it; and every one gets more education in the heels than in the head, (for, like the white Creoles, they are amazing fond of dancing); when one of them makes a ball, as they frequently do on Saturday nights, flie invites a number of her female acquaintance, also, such merchants and clerks aa will honour her on the occasion, (none of her own coloured men are admitted); she engages a bands of music, and prepares an elegant supper, with sweetmeats, wines, &c. &c. for which each gentleman pays three or four dollars: lawyers, merchants and clerks, &c. frequent such assemblies, and promiscuously meet and jostle each other: I have spent many merry nights at such balls. When you are sometime in the country, get yourself introduced by some friendly acquaintance; the affectation of these gipsies will dispel care, and make you laugh heartily; besides, you will have opportunities of seeing and getting acquainted with some of the finest girls in the

island: istand: groups of lamb-like lasses, decorated most: curiously in silks, muslins and chintz, ornamented with ribbands, fashes and costly trinkets, mining to the greatest advantage; there you may, if inclined for sport, dance the daughters of the most honourable gentlemen into love; and when the ball or rigadoon is over, escort her to your house or lodging, and taste all the wanton and ■warm endearments she can yield before morning.

Here I must give you some necessary cautions, least you be premature in your amours; as many infatuated men, of pimping jealous dispositions, go to those balls merely to watch their girls, and to keep them chaste till they return. Be cautious and secret in your intrigues, least you get into difagreeable and unnecessary broils; for, «« he that is robbed, not wanting what is stolen, let him not know it, and he is not robbed at all;" therefore, when you take a liking to one of them, enquire of herself, or of some other person, whether she is engaged or not; they will tell you candidly, and direct you so that you may gratify your desires. Mongrel wenches from their youth up are taught to be whores: you cannot affront one of them more than to give*any hint of her being dull and unskilled in the magical art; but if you wish to gain her favour, you must flatter and tell her she moves her body and limbs so engagingly, that you are confident she must be very

expert

« السابقةمتابعة »